The Handbook of Blended Learning: Global Perspectives, Local Designs.

Bonk, C. J., & Graham, C. R. (2012). The Handbook of Blended Learning: Global Perspectives, Local Designs. John Wiley & Sons.

This book focuses on business, higher education and workplace. There is also a section on future trends. It highlights most recent practices and trends from a global perspective. It is included here although there is little or no focus on language teaching and learning, but because it is often referred to as “The” guide to blended learning.

A Blended learning framework.

Negin Mirriahi, Dennis Alonzo, & Bob Fox. (2015). A Blended learning framework. Research in Learning Technology, 23.

The context of this report is higher education, but the issues described and the framework proposed are relevant for adult settlement language training programs. The authors claim that students’ demand for flexibility in learning and the affordances of technology have led to the rise of blended learning in the higher education sector. They cite three key challenges to its popularity. The first challenge is that academics often do not have the confidence or skill in using online technology. This low digital fluency limits integration of technology and impedes more effective learning. The second challenge is the notion that blended learning has not been well-defined and often isn’t used in a consistent way across an institution. They cite inconsistencies such as course design, teaching approaches, percent of face-to-face versus online time, the purpose of blending, and the role of technology. The third issue they address is the lack of standards-based tools available to both guide and evaluate blended learning course design. The authors present a standards-based framework to address these issues.

Retrievable from: http://www.researchinlearningtechnology.net/index.php/rlt/article/view/28451

A closer look at blended learning – parameters for designing a blended learning environment for language teaching and learning.

Neumeier, P. (2005).  A closer look at blended learning – parameters for designing a blended learning environment for language teaching and learning. ReCALL, 17(2), 163–178.

This journal article, written at a time when interest was building in blended learning, despite the fact that there was not a lot of research related to it, is widely cited in the literature. Neumeier provides a framework to address the question about which combination of modes provides the best blended language teaching and learning environment. Her goal is to help practitioners see and understand the complexity of blended learning environments so that they can make good use of blended learning. She provides a clear definition of blended learning and stresses the importance of finding the most effective and efficient combination of face to face and computer-assisted learning for the specific learners, context and objectives. She makes it clear that there is no course design that will work for all situations – neither in the face-to-face component, nor in the computer-assisted component. Neumeier’s six parameters identify the criteria to take into consideration for designing a course or program.

Available for Purchase (USD $30.00) at: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=355476